Dream of a world without borders, where you work on what and where your heart desires

It used to be that the companies were mostly into manufacturing, distribution or retailing. Most of this is asset-based business where people go to the ‘place of work’ where the assets were.

In this century the ratio of knowledge-based business has drastically increased compared to the hard asset based businesses. And knowledge business does not require people to be in the same room to be productive. In fact the trend has been sourcing the best team members globally and delivery project where it’s needed. Lot of alliances is temporary project based and specialized. A lot of the knowledge workers prefer more flexible lifestyle and work from place of their choice rather than formal office and once company for long.

However managing a business with dispersed team is not necessarily easy. Keeping everyone on the same page literally is tough and proper infrastructure and mindset is needed for success. We at BlastAsia since early 2000 has been working with clients across the globe and sometimes it’s a collaboration between not only our team and the client but other third party providers, their team members from another location and to say the least it has been challenging for all. Not only managing projects across the globe but maintaining a tight coordination between different functional units is critical to profitability in service business.

Xamun is our effort in providing a global platform and infrastructure for the knowledge industry to manage their business with ease and confidence. Our vision is to provide a flexible system to those in the industry to manage virtual teams, coordinate across the lifecycle of an engagement and also being connected to the resources and suppliers who are critical piece in a virtual organization. We envision a world of business where geography is not a limitation for companies to source and deliver critical projects and knowledge workers can work where their heart is, breaking the 9 to 5 work cycle, helping reduce traffic, providing better work life balance and hopefully helping in decongesting the city centers and being more ecofriendly.

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What Makes A Great Project Management Software?

Here are a few key takeaways on what constitutes a great project management software tool, based on what I picked up from my last 20 or so years of project management experience – in construction, real estate, business consulting and lately, software development – and roughly 12 years of product development experience.

  • 9 knowledge areas of PMI: Schedule, Cost, Scope, Risk, Quality, Communication, Procurement, Human Resource & Integration. For a project to succeed, the tool should help with more than just managing scope and communication and cover these areas, to avoid a myopic view of project management.
  • Agile vs. PMI: Agile, through its innovative means, reduces or eliminates the need for close monitoring of all the 9 areas, however we still need to keep an eye on them and the system should provide an integrated way to track those that need to be monitored. The software should also provide the capability to handle different project management methodologies in one system rather than forcing users to choose one over another.
  • Communication & Coordination: The key to successful project management is close communication with tasks at hand. This holds true in agile, particularly in how it eliminates documentation and other heavier monitoring. However, with larger and geographically-distributed teams, communication and coordination can become a major challenge. Unless your tool takes care of this in an integrated manner, your project can easily spin out of control.
  • Project Tasks vs. Organizational Tasks: Every member of an organization needs to handle more than just project tasks, even though that might be their primary responsibility. In smaller organizations, there is always set of tasks that are strategically important but not part of any project. Most PM tools miss out in managing both kinds of tasks in a synchronized manner, to help people in their daily responsibilities.
  • Ease of Use: I have used some very sophisticated software, but they are so difficult to install, implement and understand that a major part of my time goes into learning them. Add to that the fact that human error is highly likely during use because of their complexity. A good tool should be intuitive enough, should not take more than couple of hours to get used to, and should feel natural while using on day-to-day execution of a project. The social aspects in software today are also very interesting to induce improved usage and communication, the latter being the key to success.

I can go on with more points to add to the list, but that might just dilute the value of each item above. There is not one way to handle all projects well, and some models like the Diamond Model for project analysis can be a helpful tool to understand and segregate the sub-modules/systems by its profile and manage appropriately to improve success rate. Of course this is not up to the software to analyze and decide, but the people in charge of the project. However, when project leaders decide on a methodology, the tool should provide enough flexibility to manage the project and its parts in an integrated manner, and the tool should be suitable for the increasingly global team structure.

We at Xamun designed our product with most of these points in mind, and we are continuously improving on it as we gather more inputs from our users. We hope to hear from you soon about your Xamun experience, so you can also be part of our product development journey.